News

12 Nov

Sea Walls’ Impact on Water Quality

Education, News No Response

The photo here shows a seawall on Glen Lake that has been replaced by a natural shoreline.
 
Do you know how many seawalls are on the Glen Lake shoreline? A seawall is defined as an engineered concrete, steel, or wood structure at the water’s edge that typically is designed to curb shoreline erosion where it is installed. Interestingly, the August 2017 shoreline survey on Glen Lake indicates there are currently 18 seawalls, each about 100 foot long representing approximately 1800 feet of shoreline. Some riparians use “rip rap” or stones to “harden” their shorelines as a preferred line of protection from erosion. The use of rip rap is not considered a seawall. Rip rap when used in conjunction with other erosion prevention measures such as core log installation and native plantings can actually absorb wave energy, prevent shoreline erosion and create wildlife habitat. 
 
The entire shoreline of Glen Lake is approximately 17 miles long. Simple math tells us our shoreline is mostly seawall-free. It is widely accepted by watershed protectors that this current ratio is a good thing. Ideally, the entire shoreline of Glen Lake should be seawall-free. Seawalls on inland lakes like Glen Lake tend to be problematic for water quality due to the fact they remove vital wildlife habitat, do not absorb and filter nutrient runoff from land and deflect and even intensify wave energy onto nearby shorelines causing increased erosion and sedimentation of the water. Thereby inviting more seawalls, which would create the “need” for more seawalls, and so the story goes. In fact the MDNR does not identify any Michigan inland lake environment as an appropriate or necessary application of  Seawall type erosion prevention measures. A much better use of seawalls can be found on the Great Lakes where significantly higher wave energy occurs.
 
Installation of a seawall is expensive. However, there is a win-win option to install something far less expensive and much more lake-friendly. To learn more about removing a seawall or to consider other options for shoreline protection click on this link
 

19 Oct

Can Drones Be Useful in Monitoring Water Quality?

Education, News No Response

 
On October 17th, GLA Watershed Biologist Rob Karner, together with Dennis Wiand, Owner of Zero Gravity, LLC, presented a Leelanau Clean Water program to a group of over 30 key lake stewards from lakes around the region.  Thanks to the Glen Lake Association’s willingness to be the first to use drone technology for conducting shoreline surveys, many other lakes have either followed the GLA’s lead, or are giving serious consideration to using drones as a water quality data gathering tool.
 
The key benefit of having a shoreline videotaped via drone is to establish a benchmark for the current condition of the water’s edge. Future drone surveys will be created and compared to the original survey thereby setting up the perfect comparison opportunity.  
 
The kind of water quality data gathered is still evolving and future updates on the results of Glen Lake’s first survey, done in August of 2017, will come in subsequent communications. Examples of water quality data that are being quantified and placed on the map include: Green belts; drainage pipes; sea walls; rip rap; erosion; fish habitat; lake-water irrigation; road ends; inlets, and invasive plants.
 
While the use of the drone is proving to be a valuable, water quality-monitoring  tool, GLA will continue to monitor the water chemistry using the hydrolab, collect and analyze plankton every month in the spring, summer and fall, and participate in the volunteer-based statewide water quality monitoring program.  
 
Can you self-monitor your own shoreline?
 
One way you can monitor the water quality on your shoreline is to place two or three clean, volleyball-sized rocks at the water’s edge and wait to see if they become covered with green algae. If they are covered within a few weeks during the growing season with a healthy crop of algae, then you may have a nutrient loading problem that will need investigation.
 

09 Oct

Salmon in the Crystal River

Education, News No Response

If you can, get out in a canoe or kayak and start at the headwaters of the Crystal River and enjoy watching these amazing fish,” says  GLA Watershed Biologist, Rob Karner.

By canoe or kayak is an excellent way to watch these incredible fish as they make their journey. To access the river,  use the NPS boat launch just below Fisher Lake, off Fisher Road and Dunn’s Farm. 

 
Back in the mid 1970s, the MDNR stocked the Crystal River with salmon to curb the overpopulation of alewife that were dying and piling up on the shores of Sleeping Bear Bay each year. After stocking the river mouth, the salmon left their home stream and went out to feast on the alewife and after about two years, they migrated back to the Crystal River to spawn and die.  They were huge and they filled the Crystal River by the thousands. Fast forward to today and the salmon continue to return to the Crystal River, mostly because of natural reproduction (as opposed to stocking). They are not quite as big and the number of salmon are only in the low hundreds versus in the thousands.
 
The mystery of how they go and live in Lake Michigan and then find their home stream is truly wondrous. Perhaps they “smell” the water at the mouth and somehow sense the signature Glen Lake water that empties into the bay. Once they swim up the Crystal River another amazing thing happens. The majority of the salmon jump over the dam and enter into the Fisher Lakes. They rest there for a week or so and swim up the Fisher Canal and into Big Glen. From there, they swim along the east shore of Big Glen until they reach the mouth of Hatlem Creek. Amazingly, they swim up the creek until they reach Hatlem Pond Dam. Some of the strongest will actually get past the dam (I have no idea how this happens) and swim up into the headwaters of Hatlem Creek only to be found in water about six inches deep. All the salmon die after spawning. They gradually get decomposed by fungi – even while alive, and are ironically transformed into unwanted pollution in our lakes and streams. 
 
As amazing as it is to witness this natural wonder, the dark side of this event is that hundreds of salmon will die, decompose, and add nutrients to the water that are undesirable. In their natural habitat, bears will eat many of them as they are removed from the stream. I am not sure our black bears do this but it would help the biological pollution by removing the fish before they die.
 
So if you can, get out in a canoe or kayak and start at the headwaters of the Crystal River and enjoy watching these amazing fish. I have been watching them for over 40 years and always marvel at this natural phenomenon.
 
Rob Karner, M.S.
Watershed Biologist

11 Sep

Share Summer Photos With Us

Education, News No Response

After a spectacular summer and warm days filled with family, friends and fun, share one of your favorite Glen Lake/ Crystal River Watershed photos and we’ll feature them here throughout the winter months.

Send your best shots to: gla.photo.submission@gmail.com. 

Include a photo caption, identifying anyone in the photo you’d like mentioned. Include the date and location, and please make sure your photos are 300 dpi, no larger than 100 kb, and in jpeg format. Content should be appropriate for a general audience.

GLA reserves the right to screen and choose photos. 

We’re looking forward to seeing your images of summer fun…and just might need a reminder that warmth will indeed return when the white stuff is falling! 


31 Aug

Thank You to Our New Glen Lake Guardians!

Education, News No Response

 

The Guardian program educates and advocates protecting Glen Lake/Crystal River Watershed by engaging in best practices. Guardians voluntarily pledge to protect, and share their advocacy with others.

 

We’re excited and encouraged by the 43 new Glen Lake Guardians who signed up this summer and we’re sending them a big thank you! 

They all pledged to help on our mission to protect our Glen Lake/Crystal River Watershed by employing best practices and encouraging others to do so.

First-time pledges came from 22 people at the August annual meeting, bringing the tally of new Guardians signing up since the start of summer to 43. 

The grand Guardian total stands at 398 since 2015 and our Guardian Ambassador, Tricia Denton, is working diligently to increase these water steward numbers even higher. 

Learn more about becoming a Guardian.

Have questions? Reach Tricia by emailing her at glenlakeguardians@gmail.com.


14 Aug

Merganser Relocation Update

Education, News No Response

It takes a team…but each relocation of a merganser brood helps us to reduce the occurrence of Swimmer’s Itch.

  • 11 broods and 88 chicks were relocated this summer.
  • Our new trapping crew and equipment worked well.
  • Challenges were trying to trap a few of the broods that seemed to be extra wild (maybe harassed?)
  • Broods came on the lake three weeks late.
  • Warmer water and weather added to the contact hours for swimming.

Thank you to all who reported broods, as cooperation helps our efforts in keeping both Glen Lakes and the Crystal River Watershed as clean as possible for optimum enjoyment.


03 Aug

Annual Meeting is August 11

Education, News No Response

GLA’s Annual Meeting to Include Updates and Member Recognition

Our Annual meeting is Saturday, August 11 at 10 a.m. 

Come join us, meet members, make new friends and get up to date on all that’s happening with the GLA!

Location:

Glen Lake Community Reformed Church, 
4902 W. MacFarlane Rd., Glen Arbor.

 

A free tree seedling is waiting for you…come to our annual meeting to receive it!

Join us for educational sessions, followed by the State of the Lake report and 
member recognition awards. 

Bring a friend or neighbor, particularly someone 
who has never attended the annual meeting. 

Hope to see you August 11!


24 Jul

Task Force Named to Monitor Hatlem Pond & Creek

Education, News No Response

Hatlem Pond was dredged in 2014 and has been filling in with accumulated sediment, as expected. The questions that are before us today are: how much has it filled in since the dredge and what is the fill rate? The Glen Lake Association Board of Directors has created a four member task force to look into the future of Hatlem Creek and pond and are monitoring the situation. 

In the coming weeks, Spicer Engineering, Inc. will once again –this will be the third time –visit the pond and take depth measurements at specific points throughout the bottom. These data points will help us determine how much and how fast the pond is filling up with sediment. It will take $5,700 to cover the costs of the field work, along with the data calculations and extrapolations as to when the Hatlem Pond may need dredging again in the future.

Also, Hatlem Pond dam will undergo repairs and improvements under the direction and supervision of Spicer Engineering, Inc. and updates of the completed work in this important area will be shared in the near future. 

Finally, some shorelanders are reporting sediment build-up on the bottom of the shoals inside the “blue line.” This sediment build-up may be due to a few factors that are at this point, only speculation. It is unclear if the new, larger culvert on County Road 675 is playing a role in unimpeded sediment transport. Additionally, the winds, or lack thereof, are not “flushing” the sediment off the shoals in the early to late spring season and weak lake-wide currents are slowing down the process of sediment dispersal.

Respectfully submitted,

Rob Karner, M.S.

Watershed Biologist


10 Jul

Swimmer’s Itch Control Update

Education, News No Response

Thank you to everyone who’s reported Swimmer’s Itch cases online as well as Common Merganser brood sightings–we’ve been monitoring reports and taking action on getting the broods off the lake.

The summer of 2018 is proving to be a challenging year for Swimmer’s Itch control for these reasons:

  • Winter conditions into April delayed merganser broods coming on the lake by three weeks, therefore live trapping was delayed also. Normally, all live trapping is completed by the first week in July. 
  • As trapping requires quiet conditions– no boat traffic, dogs in the water, people on docks/human activity around the trapping area–the weather related delay to trapping now makes for difficult conditions with more activity on the water.
  • This summer’s significant heat wave has resulted in an increase to the number of swimming hours on the lake.
  • Despite having relocated all 99 mergansers off the lake last year, we cannot eradicate Swimmer’s Itch, though it is at a reduced level. We continue to research what other life cycle(s) may be at work that have nothing to do with mergansers, though we still believe that the itch-causing parasite is largely cycling through Common Mergansers. This summer’s research will hopefully confirm this fact.

Lastly, a newly hatched merganser chick must be at least four weeks old before they can infect our snails with Swimmer’s Itch. Considering that, please know that seeing a brood on the lake for several days after reporting is not contributing to the itch problem.

Trapping Results

  • Seven broods of mergansers were live trapped and moved off the lake; this represents 54 individual mergansers. 
  • At least four more broods on Glen Lake need to be trapped and all effort will be made to relocate all the broods in the coming weeks. 
  • Our goal is, and always has been, to live trap and relocate 100% of the merganser broods.  

Finally, we resourced our trapping crew and equipment based on last year’s merganser brood count for three lakes – Glen, Lake Leelanau, and Lime. At the end of this year’s trapping season, we will evaluate the results. If the brood numbers are roughly the same as last year for all three lakes, we will continue our plan to share our resources as we are today.

How to Avoid the Itch

  • If possible, swim only in deep water and avoid swimming in the shallows. 
  • Swim in the later hours of the day as opposed to swimming in the morning or early afternoon. Last year’s research on “time of day” revealed the itch can be at a high level in the morning
  • Last year’s research revealed that Swimmer’s Itch is less intense in the later weeks of summer as opposed to the early weeks. 

If you do get a case of Swimmer’s Itch, remember–it is not a dangerous disease and using a topical cream with cortisone will bring relief from itching.

Please continue to report your swimmer’s itch cases at www.glenlakeassociation.org.  Thank you!

Respectfully,

Rob Karner, M.S.

Watershed Biologist