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Annual Meeting Saturday, August 10

Education, News July 25, 2019 No Response


Bring a neighbor or friend to our annual meeting Saturday, August 10. The program will include the state of the lake report, a brief business meeting, strategic plan update and recognition awards. 
Lunch will follow and there will be free wildflower seed bombs for all!

Held at the Glen Lake Community Church, 4902 W. MacFarland Rd. in Glen Arbor, the meeting begins at 10 am.


GLA in Cooperative Lakes Monitoring Program (CLMP)

Education, News July 19, 2019 No Response

The Glen Lake Association is a member of the Cooperative Lakes Monitoring Program (CLMP) which is a volunteer inland lakes water quality monitoring program. Every week during the summer volunteers measure water clarity (secchi disk visibility depth) and at various specified dates sample for phosphorus and Chlorophyll. We measure and sample on Big and Little Glen, Brooks, and Big Fisher lakes.

The CLMP website has data on Big Glen data going back to 1979 for secchi depths and to 2001 for chlorophyll and phosphorus. Water clarity has been improving on Big and Little Glen giving it that look of the blue Mediterranean. You might think this is a good thing, but maybe not   Clarity is affected by suspended solids and algae.  We believe clarity is increasing due to the removal of zooplankton and algae by zebra or quagga mussels. This means less food for small fish and greater depth where aquatic plants can grow.   Our lakes have a lot of mussels. When we do our yearly invasive aquatic plant survey, we often bring up small mussels attached to the plants. 

The following chart shows the numbers.

Phosphorus levels for Big Glen are averaging about 4 parts per billion over the last 18 years, dropping slightly. This is very good, indicating that we don’t have a lot of fertilizer or septic runoff into the lake.  Some phosphorus is essential for plant and algae growth which is food for fish.  Our level is very low.

Chlorophyll is the pigment that allows plants (including algae) to use sunlight to convert simple molecules into organic compounds via the process of photosynthesis. Measuring chlorophyll concentrations in water is a surrogate for actually measuring algae biomass.

The chlorophyll has been steady at less than 1 part per billion for 18 years. These are very low levels which indicates little fertilizer and septic runoff.

In some lakes, as septic systems get older and homes are upsized and lived in for more of the year, phosphorus and chlorophyll levels ramp up. This has not happened to Big Glen. The same is true for Little Glen, Brooks and Big Fisher lakes. 

 


How to Avoid the Itch

Education, News July 8, 2019 No Response

  • If possible, swim only in deep water and avoid swimming in the shallows. 
  • Swim in the later hours of the day as opposed to swimming in the morning or early afternoon. Last year’s research on “time of day” revealed the itch can be at a high level in the morning
  • 2017 research revealed that Swimmer’s Itch is less intense in the later weeks of summer as opposed to the early weeks. 

If you do get a case of Swimmer’s Itch, remember–it is not a dangerous disease and using a topical cream with cortisone will bring relief from itching.

Please continue to report your Swimmer’s Itch cases at www.glenlakeassociation.org.

Thank you!