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Conference Next Week on Gateway Communities

Education, News September 16, 2019 No Response

Have you heard of “Gateway Communities?” Glen Arbor and other nearby cities and villages are called Gateway Communities due to their proximity to a national park. Learn more of what it means at these upcoming conferences.  

Tuesday, September 24th

  • Glen Arbor Township Meeting Hall
    • Business Owners/Entrepreneurs Meeting – 9:30 to 11:00 AM
    • Board Workshop- 12:30 to 2:00 pm
    • Municipal Organizations/ Non-Profit Groups/Residents – 3:30 to 5:00 PM

Wednesday, September 25th

  • The Garden Theater, Frankfort, MI
    • Municipal Organizations/ Non-Profit Groups/Residents – 9:30 to 11:00 AM
    • Board Workshop – 12:30 to 2:00 PM
    • Business Owners/Entrepreneurs Meeting – 3:30 to 5:00 PM
For additional information on Gateway Communities, their issues and opportunities, click here: SBGC Talking Points
 

 


Swimmer’s Itch a Top Member Concern at Annual Meeting

Education, News August 19, 2019 No Response

Yes! Our lakes are special but did you know that when it comes to Swimmer’s Itch, Glen Lake is not unique? Nearly all “up north” lakes have some form of the itch; in fact this is the case on a global scale. A well-documented ecological zone of itch-causing worms exists at or near the 45th parallel and not just across North America, but Europe as well. So what can we do?

Management to reduce itch remains an important part of our strategy. GLA removed record numbers of broods this year. 171 mergansers from 17 broods were relocated, while on other nearby lakes, there were zero to two broods. Why are our numbers so much higher than other lakes in the region? It may be that the great August storm of 2015 created an abundance of nesting habitat, making our watershed irresistible to merganser ducks. And we’ve continued to receive unprecedented reports of new broods into August! Is it possible that hens that evade capture with their chicks are capable of producing a second brood in a season? These highly intelligent and adaptable waterfowl continue to provide scientific mysteries to solve.

Even with our best efforts to control the issue, it is clear that parasites causing Swimmer’s Itch will continue to persist in the natural environment. Our ecosystem is more complex than we ever imagined. As of last year our research efforts identified six different worms (one was a newly-discovered species!) with 3 different host birds in our watershed alone. So what else have we learned and what can we do to avoid the unpleasant side effects of exposure? The snails that shed the itch-causing worms live on the bottom and need light to survive. In the ever clearer waters of our lakes they have been found in water up to 8 feet deep, so swim very deep! The light seeking worms are shed by snails in the morning, quickly moving to the surface where they hope to find their preferred bird host. Avoid swimming before noon! Preferably swimming after 4 pm when worm numbers will have dropped significantly. The worms concentrate in the upper 18-24 inches of water and are easily moved by wind. Do not enter the water if there is an onshore wind at your location. The wind can accumulate very high numbers of worms at the shore. Some swimmers have reported application of waterproof sunscreen or baby oil before entering the water and applying hand sanitizer and/or vigorously toweling off when leaving the water to be helpful. But not all worm species are created equal and given the wide variety of itch causing worms in our watershed these methods are only partially effective.

So after all that, what can you do if you still get “the itch”? Treat it just like you would an annoying batch of mosquito bites. Avoid scratching! Scratching or breaking open the skin will increase the itchy sensation, prolong recovery and can lead to a secondary skin infection. Use a topical itch relief product such as an ice pack or hydrocortisone cream, calamine lotion or other anti-itch cream. Take an
oral anti-histamine such as Benadryl for general itch relief. Remember that while in more severe cases the “spots” can remain visible for weeks, the itchy sensation should subside after a few days with no lasting effect. Take appropriate measures to “Swim Smart” and keep enjoying the water!


GLA Partners: Spotlight on the Leelanau Conservancy, Celebrating 30 Years!

Education, News August 2, 2019 No Response

It has been said that, “if you want to go quickly, go alone – but if you want to go far, go together.”  It is widely believed that the Leelanau Conservancy has been and continues to be a wonderful and vital partner in our mission to preserve and protect our watershed.  They use tools like “conservation easements” and “donated land” that turn into preserves to help us protect our surface and groundwater resources. 
 
For example, the Leelanau Conservancy has helped us preserve a large part of the wetlands that make up our Hatlem Creek Preserve sub-watershed which affords clear, clean water flowing into Big Glen. Further, the Palmer Woods Preserve in the uplands of our watershed has been managed in such a way that it will be protected from development thereby protecting valuable groundwater that ends up in our lakes. In addition, some of the Crystal River Wetlands are now protected from development and combine with the boundaries of the national park giving our delicate Crystal River the protection that it deserves as evidence by the clear water that some of us take for granted.
 
The conservancy also can work with individual landowners in our watershed in an effort to preserve the natural shorelines that filter out excess nutrients that can cause our lake to deteriorate. If you would like to consider a “conservation easement” (a legal agreement between a landowner and the conservancy that permanently limits a propter’s use in order to protect its conservation values) for your property, why not consider setting up a meeting with their staff and consider how you, too, might contribute to the mission of preserving and protecting our watershed.
 
For more information, click here.