News

16 Jan

High Lake Levels Recorded in Glen Lake

Education, News No Response

A wetter than usual 2019 has resulted in higher than normal lake levels in Glen Lake.

According to GLA water level committee chair, Bill Meserve, the lake is almost four inches higher than the Circuit Court ordered level.

The issue comes down too much rain and snow, says Meserve, with evaporation being a big factor and underground flow.

“We are doing what we can,” he says. “For three months the dam has been wide open and there’s nothing more we can do. Things won’t get back to target until spring.”

That is often when big chunks of ice blow up on the shores of west Little Glen and the on the east shore of Big Glen causing shoreline erosion. More precipitation was recorded by the Northwest Michigan Horticultural Research Station, with 38 inches of rain in the past 12 months.

According to Meserve, Glen Lake levels have been running high since mid-September. GLA volunteer dam committee members hope the levels subside by spring.

Officials say Crystal River levels are average for this time of year.


06 Jan

Celebrating GLA’s 75th Anniversary in 2020

Education, News No Response

Imagine. For the past seven decades, concerned citizens, property owners and civic-minded people have been true guardians of Glen Lake, committed to the purpose and values of the Glen Lake Association: preserving and protecting the water.

Although historians aren’t exactly sure how many people may have been involved with the GLA, the number is substantial. It all started back in 1945, when a concerned group developed the founding tenants. That same commitment to water protection continues today, 75 years later.

  • To mark this achievement, the GLA board of directors invite GLA members, watershed residents and the business community to come together. A special 75th Planning Committee has announced a recognition event – the GLA 75th Celebration – on Thursday, August 6, 2020. Watch for coming details.

  • Another highlight for the anniversary year are fun facts, historical stories and musings that will be published on the GLA website and in every eBlast edition for the next 12 months. Topics will cover Glen Lake’s 1960’s sandstorm, the only known ship sinking in the lake, and the use of a fire-fighting shed along the shores.
  • Be sure to watch for special events, volunteer opportunities, and a chance to share your Glen Lake memories in stories and photos on the GLA website.

Join family, friends and neighbors … It’s time to Celebrate GLA!

 

Read more about the 75th anniversary here.

 


09 Dec

Watershed Protection Overlay District Informational Meeting is Dec. 12

Education, News No Response

 An open meeting of the Glen Lake/ Crystal River Watershed Protection Project Task Force has been set and the public is welcome and encouraged to attend.

GLA is sponsoring the meeting, bringing together the four townships within the watershed–Cleveland, Glen Arbor, Kasson and Empire–to learn about and discuss the opportunity to strengthen the protection of surface and groundwater within the boundaries of the Glen Lake/ Crystal River Watershed. 

The prime focus of the meeting will be to digest how a zoning “Overlay District” plan, with a menu of several protective provisions might play out in a uniform way in all four of the townships that are inside our watershed.

The main speaker will be Tony Groves, consultant, from Progressive AE, who has helped us pioneer this proposed project. 

You won’t want to miss this important event, please email the GLA and tell us if you can participate.

 

 

The agenda for the meeting will be as follows:

  1. Welcome and Introductions – Denny Becker, Former President of GLA
  2. Presentation by Tony Groves, Consultant, Progressive AE
  3. Presentation by Roberta Dow, retired MSU educator
  4. Open Discussion – Facilitated by Rob Karner, Watershed Biologist
  5. Closing Remarks – Denny Becker

We hope to see you there!!

Thursday, Dec 12,  7:30 – 9 pm

Empire Township Hall, 1088 W Front St

Empire MI

 


21 Nov

Strategic Planning: GLA Focuses on the Future

Education, News No Response

Over the past six months, members of the GLA Board of Directors have been developing a new roadmap for the future of the organization. A five-year Strategic Plan (2020 – 2025) has been created with input from the board, staff, key stakeholders and 156 Association members who recently completed a membership survey. The extensive process is meant to help guide GLA in its direction and initiatives in four main areas;

             * Watershed Protection            * Education and Communication

             * Quality of Life                          * Organizational Development

The Association’s primary focus remains the protection of the watershed’s natural resources, ground and surface waters, plus the updating and implementation of the Glen Lake/ Crystal River Watershed Plan.

With a strong cadre of volunteers, GLA will continue to be involved in leadership, education and collaborative efforts. Topics include:

  1. Continuing to research Swimmer’s Itch
  2. Reducing nutrient loading of the watershed
  3. Eliminating pollutant sources including storm water and failed septic systems
  4. Supporting ordinances to inspect septic tanks and wells upon ownership transfer
  5. Detecting and controlling invasive species
  6. Managing the water level control structure on the Crystal River

In subsequent eBlasts and communiqués, GLA will share additional information about the above areas of focus and initiatives,

As we strive to be the recognized leader in evidence-based strategies for protecting the Glen Lake watershed while advancing environmental education, sustainable policies and quality of life.

What can everyone do?

* Join in protecting our natural resources and advocating for same – be proud of the theme: “It’s all about the Water!”

* Become a member.

* Learn about the Association through newsletters and annual plans, including implementation of this Strategic Plan and Annual Work Plans.

* Become a Glen Lake Guardian and support stewardship education.

* Volunteer – let us know how you’d like to become involved.

* As members, learn about our Board and Committees and consider participation.

* Give us your thoughts and ask questions – about this Strategic Plan or other matters of concern or interest.

* Donate to help us attain our annual plans and long term goals.

* Build your legacy to make a difference to protect and preserve this one-of-kind place.

Read the GLA Strategic Plan and survey results in their entirety here.


11 Nov

State Grant Received for Watershed Plan

Education, News No Response

GLA is proud to announce that the association was awarded one of five watershed management planning grants by the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE).

The $25,025 grant award will update the protection-oriented Glen Lake/ Crystal River Watershed Management Plan by incorporating new water quality monitoring data as well as collecting new watershed inventory data.

EGLE’s announcement stated that the plan will help protect high-quality waters by reducing non-point sources of sediment, nutrients and other contaminants.

 


24 Oct

Shoreline Buffers – The Magic of Clean Water

Education, News No Response

Nature provides us with a marvelous built-in filter that naturally protects and cleans our lake and stream water by removing excess phosphorous and nitrogen (nutrients). This built-in filter is often called a shoreline buffer or can also be referred to as a greenbelt.  

To protect our water and to keep it clean, having a natural shoreline is the best way everyone can do their part to be good lake stewards.

One way to protect our buffer or greenbelt so it can serve as an effective filter is to allow native plants to grow naturally along the water’s edge to a healthy distance away from the shoreline–at least 10 feet.

These images from our recent drone survey illustrate how to preserve a natural shoreline and still use it for recreation.

GLA encourages those who want to make recreational use of their  shoreline to consider using docks, decking, and wood platforms. Adopting this  practice will give peace-of-mind knowing you’re doing your part to protect our water quality, keeping native plants and the natural shoreline intact so filtering by the greenbelt can proceed.

Notice the orientation of dock platforms above, allowing good recreational space on the shoreline without having to weed or dump beach sand on the shore.

 


10 Oct

Information on Newly Discovered Itch Worm

Education, News No Response

The newly discovered itch worm never described in the scientific world now takes shape.

We reported on it previously in a Hot Topic that can be read in its entirety here. 

Called the Helisoma, Ram’s Horn Snail it was discovered during summer 2018.


07 Oct

The 2019 Shoreline Survey Data Has Arrived

Education, News No Response

This drone image shows a linear “aquatic garden” just off Inspiration Point on Big Glen Lake. What will this same location look like in two years?  
 

GLA, in partnership with Zero Gravity, LLC and owner Dennis Wiand, now has the 2019 shoreline survey data available for analysis. In today’s world, drone technology has proven to be very helpful in benchmarking our shoreline as well as helps us learn critical information about shorelines of the Glens and Fishers as well as the Hatlem Creek sub-watershed.

Using high resolution imagery and from a “birds eye view,” those shorelines will again be evaluated in a variety of ways and noting the changes from our first survey done in 2017. What will we be looking for? More than you might think!
 
We will be looking for evidence of shoreline erosion, measuring shoreline buffer health, finding locations for invasive plants– both aquatic and land-based– and riparian practices that play out in both good and not so good ways as it relates to our lake health. 
For example, looking for what works best for lake health, we like to count how many riparians are using lake water irrigation for their shoreline buffer, hoping to find that there are more systems being used now compared to two years ago. In this case, the more systems the better versus using well water to feed your irrigation system. Remember, using a lake water irrigation system eliminates the need for fertilizers in our sandy soils, and protects our groundwater that ultimately feeds our lake.

Another example of looking at the data is to find the locations where there are engineered sea walls made of wood, steel, or concrete. Our hope is that we will see fewer sea walls this year compared to two years ago. Engineered sea walls are not the best way to protect your shoreline from erosion and more lake friendly choices are available for your consideration.

The GLA would also like to monitor our aquatic gardens for the presence or absence of aquatic invasive plants. We are keenly interested in how the size of aquatic gardens have changed. All lakes depend on aquatic gardens to produce needed oxygen in the water so life can flourish, so monitoring the area they occupy is important as we evaluate the health of our lake.

Stay tuned in future emails about what the 2019 shoreline survey data will reveal. In some cases, the data may affect you directly or in other cases it may serve as a way for you to learn more about not only your shoreline, but what is happening around all the other neighboring shorelines.

Click here to take a personal shoreline survey and find out how you measure up to being “lake friendly.” www.mishorelandstewards.com


16 Sep

Conference Next Week on Gateway Communities

Education, News No Response

Have you heard of “Gateway Communities?” Glen Arbor and other nearby cities and villages are called Gateway Communities due to their proximity to a national park. Learn more of what it means at these upcoming conferences.  

Tuesday, September 24th

  • Glen Arbor Township Meeting Hall
    • Business Owners/Entrepreneurs Meeting – 9:30 to 11:00 AM
    • Board Workshop- 12:30 to 2:00 pm
    • Municipal Organizations/ Non-Profit Groups/Residents – 3:30 to 5:00 PM

Wednesday, September 25th

  • The Garden Theater, Frankfort, MI
    • Municipal Organizations/ Non-Profit Groups/Residents – 9:30 to 11:00 AM
    • Board Workshop – 12:30 to 2:00 PM
    • Business Owners/Entrepreneurs Meeting – 3:30 to 5:00 PM
For additional information on Gateway Communities, their issues and opportunities, click here: SBGC Talking Points
 

 


19 Aug

Swimmer’s Itch a Top Member Concern at Annual Meeting

Education, News No Response

Yes! Our lakes are special but did you know that when it comes to Swimmer’s Itch, Glen Lake is not unique? Nearly all “up north” lakes have some form of the itch; in fact this is the case on a global scale. A well-documented ecological zone of itch-causing worms exists at or near the 45th parallel and not just across North America, but Europe as well. So what can we do?

Management to reduce itch remains an important part of our strategy. GLA removed record numbers of broods this year. 171 mergansers from 17 broods were relocated, while on other nearby lakes, there were zero to two broods. Why are our numbers so much higher than other lakes in the region? It may be that the great August storm of 2015 created an abundance of nesting habitat, making our watershed irresistible to merganser ducks. And we’ve continued to receive unprecedented reports of new broods into August! Is it possible that hens that evade capture with their chicks are capable of producing a second brood in a season? These highly intelligent and adaptable waterfowl continue to provide scientific mysteries to solve.

Even with our best efforts to control the issue, it is clear that parasites causing Swimmer’s Itch will continue to persist in the natural environment. Our ecosystem is more complex than we ever imagined. As of last year our research efforts identified six different worms (one was a newly-discovered species!) with 3 different host birds in our watershed alone. So what else have we learned and what can we do to avoid the unpleasant side effects of exposure? The snails that shed the itch-causing worms live on the bottom and need light to survive. In the ever clearer waters of our lakes they have been found in water up to 8 feet deep, so swim very deep! The light seeking worms are shed by snails in the morning, quickly moving to the surface where they hope to find their preferred bird host. Avoid swimming before noon! Preferably swimming after 4 pm when worm numbers will have dropped significantly. The worms concentrate in the upper 18-24 inches of water and are easily moved by wind. Do not enter the water if there is an onshore wind at your location. The wind can accumulate very high numbers of worms at the shore. Some swimmers have reported application of waterproof sunscreen or baby oil before entering the water and applying hand sanitizer and/or vigorously toweling off when leaving the water to be helpful. But not all worm species are created equal and given the wide variety of itch causing worms in our watershed these methods are only partially effective.

So after all that, what can you do if you still get “the itch”? Treat it just like you would an annoying batch of mosquito bites. Avoid scratching! Scratching or breaking open the skin will increase the itchy sensation, prolong recovery and can lead to a secondary skin infection. Use a topical itch relief product such as an ice pack or hydrocortisone cream, calamine lotion or other anti-itch cream. Take an
oral anti-histamine such as Benadryl for general itch relief. Remember that while in more severe cases the “spots” can remain visible for weeks, the itchy sensation should subside after a few days with no lasting effect. Take appropriate measures to “Swim Smart” and keep enjoying the water!